35 foot waves at K5

Figure 1

The wake from Caroline is producing 35 foot waves at K5 at 08 UTC this morning (59.1° north 11.6° west) (fig 1). The cold front dropped the temperature almost 9°C in three hours on top of Cairngorm in the early hours (fig 2).

Figure 2

No boy scout worth his salt would have been as foolish to camp out on the Cairngorms last night, and if he had been, he certainly would never have got his tent up in a hurricane force 12 and gusts to 116 mph (fig 3).

Figure 3

Yesterdays 33 feet wave heights

Looking at the instrumental wave heights and winds from some of the UK weather buoys, low Victor certainly generated some big waves yesterday in the eastern Atlantic.

Figure 1

At 22 UTC yesterday the weather buoy 62095 also known as M6 (fig 1) had reported a wave height of 9.0 metres (29.5 feet), whilst at 09 UTC that morning, 457 kilometres further south (fig 3), weather buoy 62442 also known as ‘Pap’ (fig 2), reported a wave height of 10.1 metres (33.1 feet). It should be interesting to see what wave heights they’ll be measuring as the remnants of hurricane Maria pass close by this Sunday.

Figure 2

The strongest winds didn’t occur at either of the above two weather buoys, but from weather buoy 62105 also known as K4, which reported a means speed of 45 knots and gust to 66 knots (76 mph) at 23 UTC yesterday evening, although there may well have been higher values that were missed due to instrument failure (fig 3).

Figure 3

My SYNOP program has been an ongoing project now for almost 20 years, and in all that time I’ve never thought to plot the instrumental wave height from weather buoys, so I’ve decided to correct that omission and add it to my plot from now on. I didn’t know where I should place it, so for the time being I plot immediately below the station circle in a blue font. Here are the relative positions of the three weather buoys that I’ve included plot grids for.

Figure 4