The overnight thunderstorms

Figure 1 – Courtesy of Blitzortung

Here are a few graphics to show the extent of this early thundery spell across the country, the severity and extent of which caught both the ECMWF and the UKMO NWP models out yesterday. As far as I can see most of the lightning was from unstable medium level cloud rather than the more traditional cumulonimbus (fig 1). The rainfall from the thunderstorms looks to have been concentrated in a swathe SSW-NNE through Hampshire, where my estimates from weather radar suggest that as much as 32-40 mm fell in the wettest areas (fig 2).

Figure 2
Figure 3 – None of the rain gauges where in the right places, where was Southampton Weather Centre when you needed it?

I won’t go on about just how poor or late the warnings were for yesterdays thunderstorms from the Met Office, or just how divorced the NWP graphics used by either themselves or the BBC was from reality, the following screen shots will have to suffice (fig 4).

Figure 4 – Courtesy of the Met Office (1&2), Blitzortung (3) and the BBC (4).

Author: xmetman

An ex-metman passionate about all things to do with weather, climate and clouds

One thought on “The overnight thunderstorms”

  1. The only MO warning I saw yesterday was for the North of England, but all of the lighting strikes seemed to be in the South.

    Were there warnings issued for the South later in the day?

    There is now heavy rain forecasted for here around noon and it is getting very gloomy.

    Of course there was no actual rain overnight when the rain warnings were in force and they have now expired.

    So not much use as warnings on the whole.